1999 Tornado And I-beam

Of all the Haysville tornado stories, I don’t recall this one that I just come across…

Photo date: May 6, 1999
Photographer: FEMA / Mannie Garcia
Photo location: Haysville KS
FEMA Director (L), James Lee Witt describes to Kansas Governor (R), Bill Graves how a thirty foot, one inch thick, steel I-beam is driven into the ground in Haysville, Kansas. The steel I-beam found its way into the backyard of Mr. Wallace (C) whose home was destroyed. Winds exceeding 275 MPH during the tornado carried the I-beam over a quarter mile causing the damage. Accompanying the men is John Miller, (2R) Regional Director/FEMA. Photo by Mannie Garcia/FEMA.

Photo and info taken from the FEMA website.

Salem Township History

All information on this page was taken from William G. Cutler’s History of the State of Kansas.

Salem was organized in 1871, by S. Dunkin. W. F. Ransom was the first settler. He located in November, 1869. C. B. Haskins, who was mustered out of service at Wichita, in 1869, located the second claim. J. W. Hubbles, Frank Dunkin and James M. Vigus located the same year. In 1870, came A. Dodge, W. Phillips, William Davis, Mr. Powers, S. Dunkin, J. A. Nelson and W. W. Hays. The township is well watered by the Cowskin Creek and its tributaries, while the Arkansas River is its eastern boundary. The township has three good flouring-mills, four schoolhouses, two good stores with postoffice at Hays’ mill, where also is located the well known camp meeting and picnic grove. Corn, wheat, fruit and vegetables are staple products of Salem, while it probably furnishes more stock for the market than any other township in the county. Population, 604; valuation of property, $164,107.

Early Salem Township Residents

J. S. CARSON, farmer, Section 17, P. O. Waco. He was born in Reading, Ohio, in 1848; son of Robert and Hannah (Nichols) Carson. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Ella M. Fink. They have one child – Lizzie M. His wife died in March, 1876, and he was married in the fall of the same year to Miss Mary E. Tomlin, daughter of James S. and Annie Tomlin. They have three children – Ada B., Annie D., and Carrie. He came to Kansas, in 1872, and located on the farm where he now resides. He was Treasurer of Salem Township and Director of the School District for five years.

C. A. CARTWRIGHT, farmer, Section 30, P. O. Haysville, was born in Sangamon County, Ill., in 1852; son of V. C. and Cynthia Scott Cartwright. Was married in 1876 to Miss Ida Robinson, daughter of N. H. and Martha Beckwith Robinson. Has two children – Alice and Nellie. Came to Kansas in 1872, located on the farm where he now resides; owns 160 acres of land; has been Treasurer of Salem Township one term.

VIRGIL CLOUD, farmer, Section 5, P. O. Haysville; son of Newton and Elizabeth Wood Cloud; was born in Morgan County, Ill., in 1846. Married, in 1868, to Miss Mary A. Hays, daughter of Lewis L. and Mary Lewis Hays. Has four children – Edgar, Eugene, Walter and Georgia. Came to Kansas in 1871, located on Section 12, Ohio Township; remained for two years, then moved to Section 5, Salem Township, where he now resides; owns eighty acres in Section 5, and 160 acres in Ohio Township. Was Township Clerk of Ohio township.

S. DUNKIN, farmer and merchant, Section 6, P. O. Haysville; was born in Indiana, in 1851; son of B. M. and Elizabeth Peyton Dunkin. He was married in 1873 to Miss Salome Sence, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Sence. He has two children – May and Daisie. He came to Kansas in 1871, and located on his farm in Section 6. Has also twenty acres in Section 5, with a residence and a store, which he built in 1882, 20×40 feet, and carries a general assortment of goods. He commenced merchandising in 1879 as a successor to Mr. Fuller. The business has increased from $7,000 in 1879 to $18,000 in 1883. In 1880 he was engaged in taking the census of Salem Township. He was Trustee of Salem Township in 1878. Is Deputy Postmaster of Haysville. Is a member of the I. O. O. F.

JOSIAH F. FAGER, farmer, miller and fruit grower, Sections 5 and 32, P. O. Haysville was born in Ogle County, Ill., in 1849; son of Conrad and Mary Myers Fager. He was married in 1877 to Miss Antonia Shaw, daughter of Caleb and Mary Shaw, who was born in 1858 in Shelby County, Ill. They have one child, Clinton. Mr. F. came to Kansas in 1871, and located on his farm in Ohio Township, Section 12. He moved to Section 5 in 1878. He owns 160 acres in Waco Township, and ten acres in Section 5, Salem Township, where he resides. Owns a half interest in the grist mill with W. W. Hays. Was assistant Postmaster at Haysville for five years.

ADAM GLASER, farmer, Section 14 and 15, P. O. Waco, was born in Germany, in 1830; son of Caspar and Catharine Glaser. Was married in 1857 to Miss Elizabeth Zener, daughter of John and Margaret Zener. Has eight children – Mary, John, Margaret, William Lizzie, Kate, Eddie and Bertie. Mr. Glaser came to Kansas in 1864, located in Douglas County engaged in farming; remained there nine years, and then moved to Sedgwick County, and located on the farm where he now resides; owns 320 acres of land. Is a member of the Evangelical Church.

HENRY I. F. GROSH, farmer, Sections 5 and 6, P. O. Haysville, was born in Maryland in 1836; son of George W. and Catherine Fisher Grosh. He was married, in 1867, to Miss Marion J. Hays, daughter of Lewis L. and Mary Lewis Hays, who was born in Illinois, in 1848. Have four children – Mabel, Inez, Viola and Lulu. He came to Kansas in 1873, and located at Wichita, engaged in shoemaking, and remained five years. In 1878 he located on his farm, where he now resides, in Salem Township. Was in the War of the Rebellion and enlisted in 1864, in the First Regiment Maryland Volunteers, Company F, Potomac Brigade. The regiment was changed to the Thirteenth Maryland Volunteers, and was mustered out in 1865. From 1861 to 1864, he was engaged at different times doing guard duty on the Potomac. Is a member of the I. O. O. F.

LEWIS L. HAYES, farmer, Section 5, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1812. Came to Kansas in 1871, located on a farm in Section 5, and engaged in farming until his death, which occurred in 1878.

WILLIAM W. HAYS, farmer and miller, Section 5, Salem Township, P. O. Haysville, son of Lewis L and Mary Lewis Hays, was born in Franklin, Ill., in 1840. Was married in 1865, to Miss Julia Cavanaugh, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Cavanaugh. Has five children – Annie, Katie, Amy, William and Richard. Came to Kansas in 1871, located on Section 5, where he now resides. In 1875 built a grist mill on the Cowskin Creek, in Section 5 which he now owns in company with Mr. J. F. Fager. He also owns a grist mill at Marshall, Sedgwick County, and one in London Township, Sumner County. In 1876 started the village of Haysville, which now consists of a store, blacksmith shop and mill. The postoffice was located in 1876; Mr. Hays appointed Postmaster, which office he now holds; owns a fine grove, which is a noted resort for pleasure parties in summer, and for camp meetings. Is a member of the I. O. O. F.

JOSEPH W. JOLLY, blacksmith, Section 5, P. O. Haysville, was born in Holmes County, Ohio, in 1857; son of Jackson and Martha (Carr) Jolly. Was married in 1882, to Miss Mary S. Sitten, daughter of William V. Sitten. Came to Kansas in 1877, located in Cowley County, engaged in blacksmithing, remained one year, and then moved to South Haven, Sumner County; remained until 1880, then located at Salt Springs. In the spring of 1882, built a shop and started the business at Geuda, and remained until 1883, when he moved to Haysville, where he is now engaged in blacksmithing; successor to Mr. Murphy in the business.

PETER KLEINEGGER, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Derby, was born in Prussia, in 1827; son of Francis J. and Elizabeth Kleinegger. Was married, in 1859, to Miss Mary Fix. Has two children – Frances W. and Mary Ann Kleinegger; wife died in 1862. Married in 1866, to Miss Ellen Perney, have one child, Peter. Mr. Kleinegger came to Kansas in 1878, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land in company with J. J. Kleinegger. Is a member of the Catholic Church.

J. J. KLEINEGGER, farmer, Section 14, P. O. Derby, was born in Ohio, in 1837; son of Francis J. and Elizabeth Kleinegger. Was married in 1863, to Miss Angeline Gurno, daughter of Joseph and Sallie Gurno. Has four children – George L., John E., James P. And Mary A. Mr. Kleinegger came to Kansas in 1878, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land in company with Peter Kleinegger. Is a member of the Catholic Church. Francis Kleinegger, father of Peter and J. J. Kleinegger located in Ohio in 1835, on the Western Reserve, what is now Ottawa County.

JAMES M. KIRBY, farmer, Sections 5 and 8, P. O. Haysville, was born in Vigo County, Ind., in 1837, son of John and Mary (Anderson) Kirby. He was married in 1865, to Miss Lucind Isbell, daughter of H. C. and Jane Isbell. They have three children – Emma, Melissa and Samuel. Mr. Kirby came to Kansas in 1876, and located on the farm where he now resides. He owns 160 acres of land, and has a fine orchard, 200 apple trees, 700 peach and 100 cherry trees, besides a variety of small fruit. He was in the War of the Rebellion, and enlisted in 1861, in the Thirty-fifth Illinois Regiment, Volunteers, Company A; was in the battles of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Resaca, and other engagements. He was Color Bearer in an engagement near Dallas. Was with Gen. Sherman’s command in his march to Atlanta, and was mustered out in September, 1864, at Springfield, Ill. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

G. D. KRIEBEL, farmer and miller, Section 17, P. O. Waco, was born in Lehigh County, Penn., in 1829, son of Jacob and Anna Kriebel. Was married in 1853, to Miss Susannah Strunk, daughter of Charles and Barbara Strunk, born in Pennsylvania in 1830. Has five children – Joel, Mahlon, Emma, Hannah and Ellen C. Came to Kansas in 1872, located on Section 17, where he now resides; engaged in farming and manufacturing of sorghum. In 1879, commenced milling with one corn buhr and a water wheel, on the Cow Skin Creek, without a building. In July, 1880, commenced building a mill, completed it in 1881, with two wheat buhrs, one corn buhr, with all the latest improvements in machinery, two turbine wheels. Building 20×36, two stories. In the fall of 1882, opened a store, and now has a general assortment of goods. Was appointed Postmaster for Waco, in 1880, which office he now holds. Is a member of the Evangelical Society. Is an ancient member of the I. O. O. F.

JAMES B. LAWRENCE, physician, Section 5, P. O. Haysville, was born in Litchfield County, Conn., in 1846; son of Henry W. and Abigail Doolittle Lawrence. Was married in 1872, to Miss Edith E. Lee, daughter of Alfred and Susan J. Lee; born in 1856. Has one child – Ethel Lawrence. Was educated at South Berkshire Institute, Mass.; graduated in class of 1869; graduated in the medical department of Georgetown College, in Washington, D. C., in class of 1872. Was in the War of the Rebellion; enlisted in 1864, in the Marine Corps, and served on the blockade; was with the fleet in taking Fort Fisher. In March 1865, joined the United States Steamer Wachusetts; spent one year in the Atlantic and Indian oceans; joined the Asiatic Squadron in March, 1866; was with that squadron two years; returned to the United States in 1868, and was discharged; was apothecary in the naval hospital at Washington from 1870 to 1872; was Clerk in the Money Order Bureau, General Postoffice Department from 1872 to 1873; was acting assistant surgeon in army from 1873 to 1879, serving at various stations in the division of the Pacific a large portion of the time; under General Crook in Arizona from 1879 to 1881; was engaged in practice and in mining in Arizona. In 1882 came to Kansas on account of broken health; located in Salem Township, where he now resides engaged in the practice of medicine. Is a member of the G. A. R. Garfield Post, No. 25. Was County Treasurer of Mohave County, Arizona.

JAMES McADAM, farmer, Section 28, P. O. Waco, was born in Ireland in 1837; son of James and Jane Hegan McAdam. Was married in 1865 to Miss Jane Allen, daughter of John and Jane Wann Allen. Has three children – Owidiel, John and Nellie. Mr. McAdam came to Kansas in 1871; located on the farm where he now resides; owns 600 acres of land; is engaged in general farming and stock raising; has a good orchard of six acres, containing apple, peach, pear and cherry trees, with a variety of small fruit. Is a member of the Masonic fraternity, A., F. & A. M.

CHRISTOPHER MEYER, farmer and merchant, Sections 16 and 22, P. O. Waco, was born in Germany in 1850; son of Herman and Dora Meyer. He was married in 1877, to Miss Mary Stadtman, daughter of John and Mary Stadtman. He came to Kansas in 1878 and located in Kingman County; engaged in farming and remained until 1881, when he moved to Salem Township and commenced merchandising. He started the first store in Waco, and now carries a general assortment of goods; also carries on his farm.

J. M. MIARS, farmer, Section 11, P. O. Derby, was born in Ohio, in 1836; son of Samuel and Hannah (Haines) Miars. Was married in 1871 to miss Mattie Mason, daughter of Thomas and Asenath (Davis) Mason. Has one child, Gracie. Mr. Miars came to Kansas in 1871 and located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 608 acres of land; has an orchard of three acres. Was in the United States service, in the Ohio Militia, in resisting the Morgan raid into that State during the late war. Is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the I. O. O. F.

J. E. NELSON, farmer, Section 17, P. O. Waco, was born in Vigo County, Ind., in 1832; son of James and Susannah (Cruse) Nelson. Came to Kansas in 1871 and located on the farm where he now resides. Engaged in general farming. Was in Illinois from 1874 to 1877. Was in the War of the Rebellion. Enlisted in April, 1865, in the Fifty-third Illinois Volunteers, Company A. Was ordered to Washington and at Fortress Monroe. Was mustered out in 1865.

J. A. NELSON, farmer, Section 5, P. O. Haysville, was born in Vigo County, Ind., in 1828; son of James and Susannah (Cruse)Nelson. Was married to Miss Sarah J. Hautsford, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Bruce)Hautsford; born in Kentucky, in 1841. Has three children – Thomas H., John and James. Came to Kansas in 1871 and located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres. Has a fine orchard of 175 apple trees, 300 peach trees and a few apricots, which are now bearing, and has a variety of small fruits. Was in the War of the Rebellion. Enlisted in 1865 in the Twenty-eighth Illinois Volunteers, Company G. Was ordered to Mobile. Was in the hospital at Memphis four months, and then removed to Jefferson barracks, Mo. Was mustered out in August, 1865. Has been Township Trustee of Salem for four years. Was County Commissioner of Sedgwick County, in 1876 and 1877. Is a member of Garfield Post, No. 25, G. A. R., and of the Old Settlers’ Association.

WILLIAM NEVIL, farmer, Section 8, P. O. Haysville, was born in Edgar County, Ill., in 1841. He is the son of James and Sarah (Nixon) Nevil. He married Miss Leonah Ripple, in 1880, daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth (Davis) Ripple, who was born in Illinois, in 1851. They have one child, William B. He came to Kansas in 1881, locating on the farm where he now resides. He was in the War of the Rebellion, enlisting in 1861, in the Ninth Missouri Volunteers, Company H. Was transferred from the Ninth Missouri Volunteer Infantry, Company H, to the Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, Company H, in 1862. Was in the battles of Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Perryville and other engagements of his command. He was wounded in Perryville, Ky. Was in the hospital four months with his wounds. Veteraned in 1863. He was mustered out in December, 1865, in Texas. Is a member of the Old Settlers’ Association.

WILLIAM PARKER, farmer, Section 33, P. O. Mulvane, was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1833, son of Thomas and Mary A. (Jameson) Parker. Was married in 1856, to Miss Eliza Myers, daughter of Isaac and Eliza (Grey) Myers, born in Ohio in 1835; has eight children – Huldah, Stephen A., Emma, Laura, Henry, William, Annie, and Lewis. Came to Kansas in 1877; located on the farm where he now resides; owns 182 acres; engaged in general farming. Has been a member of the School Board in Salem Township for four years.

J. M. PEGRAM, miller and farmer, Section 33, P. O. Mulvane, was born in North Carolina in 1829, son of Jacob and Ursula (Dwiggins) Pegram. He married, in 1851, Miss Lydia Stephens, daughter of George and Sarah Stephens, born in North Carolina in 1810. They have one child, Albert. Mr. Pegram came to Kansas in 1875, located in Belle Plaine, Sumner County, and engaged in farming until 1878, when he moved to Mulvane and engaged in merchandising. In 1882 he moved to Salem Township, and purchased the flouring mill on the Cow Skin Creek, Section 33; mill 28×30 feet, two stories, known as the Mulvane Mill; has two run of stone, with a capacity of 100 bushels per day. He was elected Justice of the Peace in Mulvane in 1881; resigned in the fall of the same year, on account of other business. He is a member of the Society of Friends. Left North Carolina in 1861, on account of persecution, he being a strong Anti-slavery man.

E. W. PHILLIPS, farmer, Section 35, P. O. Mulvane, was born in Addison County, Vt., in 1847, son of Joseph and Dorethea (Eastman) Phillips. He was married, in 1868, to Miss Jennie E. Adams, daughter of William and Nancy Adams. They have four children – Albert L., Luella M., Arthur L., and Willard R. Phillips. He came to Kansas in the fall of 1870, and located on Section 25, remaining ten years. In 1881 he located on the farm where he now resides, Section 35. When he first located on the described land, the plats had not been received at the land office. He located on a claim that had been claimed and abandoned by one John Marshall, better known in those days as “Curly Marshall,” and after some trouble and threats of personal violence, compromised with Marshall, and secured his title from the Government. He was in the War of the Rebellion, enlisting in March, 1864, in the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry Volunteers, Company B. Was in the engagement of Egypt Station, where his command encountered Gen. Hood, and at Yazoo City, Miss., and other engagements of his command. He was mustered out in October, 1865. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Mulvane Lodge, No. 174.

MATTHEW ROSSWOG, farmer, Section 28, P. O. Waco, was born in Germany in 1827, son of Andrew and Mary A. (Zimmerman) Rosswog. He was married in 1858, to Miss Louise Leyotel, daughter of Augustus and Julia (Hube) Leyotel, who was born in Henry, Ill., in 1838. They have one child, Martha. Mr. Rosswog came to Kansas in 1871, from Illinois. He located on the farm where he now resides, when there were only thirty person in what is now Salem Township. At that time there was not a traveled road in the town. He has a fine farm, with good buildings and orchards, and is engaged in stock-raising in connection with his farming. He was in the War of the Rebellion, and enlisted, in 1864, in the Forty-eight Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, Company A. He was in the battles of Nashville, Snow Hill, Decatur, Ala., and other engagements of his command. He was mustered out in December, 1865. He is a member of the Protestant Methodist Church; is an ancient member of the I. O. O. F.

GEORGE RUTER, farmer, Sections 15 and 10, P. O. Derby. Was born in Germany in 1843. Son of Chris. And Mary Ruter. Was married, in 1867, to Miss Mary Seekamp, daughter of Henry and Anna Seekamp. Has one child – Minnie. Mr. Ruter came to Kansas in 1866, located in Wabaunsee County. Remained three years. In 1869 located in Sedgwick County, on a farm, in Section 11, Salem Township. Remained until 1882, when he moved on the farm where he now resides. Owns 240 acres of land. Is a member of the Lutheran Church.

LEWIS SCOTT, farmer, Section 33, P. O. Waco, was born in Clinton County, Ind., in 1842. He is the son of E. W. And Hannah Scott. He was married in 1868, to Miss Maria Porter, daughter of Tivis and Sarah Porter. She was born in Indiana in 1848. Has six children – Clara A., James B., William F., Birdie, Ella M., and Lewis Scott. Came to Kansas in 1870, located Section 28; in 1874 located on the farm where he now resides. Was in the War of the Rebellion, enlisted in 1862, in the Fifth Cavalry, Ninetieth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Company L. Was in the siege of Knoxville, and in the battles of his command. Was taken prisoner at Macon, Ga., in July, 1864; was held at Andersonville Prison for eight months. Was on the ill-fated Sultana from Vicksburg to Memphis when she exploded her boiler, and was one of the 700 saved out of the 2,200 on board. Was mustered out of service in 1865.

JESSE SENCE, farmer, Sections 17 and 8, P. O. Haysville, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in 1851; is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth Sence. He was married in 1879, to Miss Effie Tucker, daughter of Rollins and Abigail Tucker. They have two children – Ira and Maud. He came to Kansas in 1874, and located on the farm where he now resides. He built his present residence in 1882, on Section 17. He owns 160 acres of land.

WILLIAM H. SILVERWOOD, farmer, Section 35, P. O. Mulvane, was born in Delaware County, Ohio, in 1844; son of Thomas and Sarah Taynor Silverwood. He was married in 1867, to Miss Sarah Poskitt, daughter of John and Hannah (Joyce) Poskitt. He came to Kansas in 1871 from Ohio, and located on Section 22, Salem Township. In 1880 he located on the farm where he now resides. They have five children – John, Minnie L., Harry, Annie, and Ada Silverwood. He was in the War of the Rebellion, and enlisted in 1861, in the forty-first Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Company I. Was in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain. He carried the colors for 1,900 forlorn-hope men down the Tennessee River, around Lookout Mountain, and at Mission Ridge, Chickamauga, and Orchard Knob, and Atlanta. He was promoted to Lance Sergeant, and commanded Gen. T. J. Wood’s escort. Held the position until the close of the war, and was mustered out in November, 1865. Was also Color Sergeant for the Forty-first Ohio Regiment.

JAMES STEWART, farmer, Section 34, P. O. Mulvane. Was born in Ireland, in 1842, son of John and Mary Mulholland Stewart. He was married in 1868, to Miss Susannah Ely, daughter of Solomon and Rachel Ely, born in Illinois in 1842. They have three children – Rachel, June and John. Susie died in 1877, aged two years. He came to Kansas in 1871, and located on the farm where he now resides. He was in the War of the Rebellion and enlisted in 1861, in the Forty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Company K. Was in the battle of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Shiloh and other engagements of his command. He was wounded four times at Fort Donelson; one wound in the back from which the ball was not extracted. He draws a pension. He was mustered out in 1862, on account of disability. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Mulvane Lodge No. 174.

WILLIAM THOMANN, farmer, Section 15, P. O. Derby. Was born in Switzerland in 1854. Son of Rudolf and Elizabeth Buscher Thomann. Was married in 1881 to Miss Mary Glaser, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Zener Glaser. Has one child Anna. Mr. Thomann came to Kansas in 1869, located in Douglas County, remained one year then located in Sedgwick County, Salem Township, Sections 11 and 14. Remained for nine years, then moved on the farm where he now resides. Owns eighty acres of land, also one-fifth interest in the estate of Rudolf Thomann, deceased of 160 acres.

JAMES S. TOMLIN, farmer, Section 18, P. O. Haysville. Was born in New Jersey in 1835, son of Almorin and Rhoda Smith Tomlin. He was married in 1857 to Miss Anna E. Townsend, daughter of John and Mary A. Sutton Townsend, who was born in 1839. They have twelve children – Mary E., Louie E., William E., Samuel B., Mattie B., Howard S., Edgar W., James N., Frank M., Albert Q., Anna J. And Fred L. Mr. T. came to Kansas in 1871, located on the farm where he now resides. Owns 160 acres of land. Has been engaged in farming from that time. Is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

C. M. TYRRELL, farmer, Section 21, P. O. Waco. He was born in Berkshire County, Mass., in 1821, son of Truman and Aurelia Morse Tyrrell. He was married in September, 1852, to Miss Elizabeth Ferris, daughter of James C. And Alida Winekoop Ferris, who was born in 1832, in Wyoming County, N. Y. They have one child, Frank Tyrrell. He came to Kansas in 1871, and located on Section 21, where he now resides engaged in farming. He was engaged as a civilian in the United States service in Minnesota in 1863 and 1864. During the Indian outbreak he was Clerk in the Quartermaster’s Department up the Missouri River. He was elected Justice of the Peace of Waco Township at the first election held. Waco then contained four townships. He held the office for nine years, and was also Justice four years in New York State. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, A., F. & A. M. His wife died in Minneapolis, Minn, in January, 1862.

JAMES E. WATT, farmer, Section 5, P. O. Haysville, was born in Canada, in 1856, son of Robert and Olive Sales Watt. Was married in 1876 to Miss Addie Lloyd, daughter of Stephen and Eliza Zimmerman Lloyd, who was born in Grant County, Wis., in 1856; has three children, Milton R., Emma F. and James E. He came to Kansas in 1866 with his uncle, located at Cottonwood Falls, Chase Co., in 1866 went to Wichita for five years, was engaged in herding and working on farm. In 1873 went to Reno County, and engaged in farming one year. In 1874 he located in Salem Township, where he now resides.

J. L. WILEY, farmer, Section 4, P. O. Haysville, was born in Vermillion County, Ill., in 1848, son of William and Sarah Lowman Wiley. He was married in 1867 to Miss Sarah J. Moore, daughter of Luther and Mary J. Stewart Moore, born in Illinois in 1848, has two children – Mary A. and Homer E. He came to Kansas in 1878, located on the farm where he now resides, owns 160 acres of land, and is engaged in general farming. He buried an infant son in 1868.

Sandy Beach

This sand pit turned swimming hole just North of Haysville at 5800 South Seneca was an area hot spot during the summer months. I believe it was open from sometime in the 1940s to either the late 1970s or early 1980s.

More photos of Sandy Beach can be seen here.

Train Depot

The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway bought land west of Haysville’s Main street in 1892. In 1903 a depot was opened and passenger trains shuttled people to and from Wichita. Notice the spelling of Haysville on the depot. Haysville was often spelled Hayesville thought to be named after 19th president Rutherford B. Hayes.

Pictured below is depot agent Ed Burke.

Haysville Agriculture

Excerpt from the South Wichita Haysville Area Plan

The early settlements in the area were centered on access to the railroads serving the area. The town of Haysville was established by W.W. Hays in 1891 via a plat of 161.5 acres. Haysville prospered after the opening of its train depot in 1903 and rail service remained an important part of its economy for quite sometime as it allowed for produce shipment as far away as New York City. During the First World War, Haysville became a shipping point to Kansas City and Chicago for all kinds of farm grown products. With the development of better and cheaper transportation facilities in other parts of the United States, it became possible for major cities to be supplied with fresh farm products from the major farm produce areas -Florida, Georgia, Arizona, and California -and the Haysville supply was left to local markets only, mostly via US Highway 81 constructed after the First World War. The surpluses contributed to depressed prices and eventually the Haysville truck farming industry declined. Most of the surrounding countryside at that time was devoted to agriculture with a number of small schools in the area. However, the development and character of the area was dominated by agriculture and dependent on this rail access for connection to other communities in the area, primarily Wichita to the north and Wellington to the south.

Cowskin Creek


The creek…

Lazily meandering through the center of Haysville is the Cowskin Creek. The creek is said to have gotten it’s name from cattlemen who would herd their cattle along the Chisholm Trail northwest of Haysville. One winter a blizzard came through and killed the cows that were feeding on the grass along the creeks banks. The cattleman could do nothing with the cows but skin them. Thereafter it was referred to as the Cowskin Creek.

Flooding…
At one time the Cowskin was deeper with more twists and turns and would occasionally flood Haysville. Rerouting of the creek through town around 1926 and in 1959 the completion of the Wichita-Valley Center Floodway (big ditch) alleviated the high water problems. Part of the creeks original path can still be seen today in the backyards of houses at the south end of town.


The mill…

In 1874 a grist mill was built on the bank of the Cowskin to process corn that was harvested in the area. The Cowskin was a source of entertainment for early Haysville residents who would swim in it during the summer, skate on it during the winter and hunt and trap it’s banks all year. Other activities on or around the Cowskin through the years have included craw-dad fishing, rafting, bicycling trails and the big swing.


Today…

the Cowskin makes a nice backdrop for Haysville’s bike and walking path and a nice subject for beautiful photos such as this one by Bob Rardin.